The Birth and Rebirth of the American Diner

The Birth and Rebirth of the American Diner

The smell alone can lure most of us to the comfortable booth of a classic American diner. Sputtering grease wafts through the air, letting you know that the bacon will be crisp. You can smell the caramelizing onions on the flat top grill waiting to be put in an omelet. Coffee steams under your nose as you make room for a side of hash browns.   It can be your home away from home or just a part of your daily routine. We often socialize and make friends while slowly becoming “regulars”. And before you know it, you don’t even have to tell your waitress what you want anymore.   Let’s take a look at the history of the American diner and how it has evolved over time. The Humble Beginning Of The American Diner. Walter Scott, a Providence, Rhode Island-type compositor and part-time pressman, unintentionally created the American diner. Scott, then 17, started selling sandwiches and coffee to newspaper night workers and men’s club patrons. In 1872, Scott began selling food from his covered wagon-covered horse-drawn express wagon outside of the Providence Journal newspaper office. The American Diner Gets Its First Facelift. A few people were inspired by the…